Buffalo Federation of Neighborhood Centers
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THE BUFFALO FEDERATION OF NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS FORMULA FOR A STRONGER COMMUNITY BEGINS WITH ASSISTING INDIVIDUALS WITH THEIR PATHS TO SUCCESS

FIVE STAR BANK AWARDS $2,000 TO FUND THE BFNC HOPE CENTER’S INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC IMPACT & FINANCIAL WELL-BEING
 

The Buffalo Federation of Neighborhood Centers’ (BFNC) mission of assisting individuals with overcoming life obstacles include a network of services. With the assistance of the United Way of Buffalo and Erie County and Five Star Bank the BFNC Hope Center was created to provide participants customized financial coaching and planning to enhance quality of life, increase financial security, and develop skills to achieve economic independence. 

The BFNC Hope Center, based upon the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Pathway to Prosperity program, is a neighborhood resource center that offers individuals and families the ease of obtaining the financial assistance they need at one location.

“Buffalo Federation of Neighborhood Centers for over 100 years has been in the business of elevating and assisting neighbors with acquiring the skills needed to achieve their life goals and independence,” stated Ricardo I. Herrera, BFNC Executive Director. 

Five Star Bank C&I Lending Executive and Buffalo Regional President Ted Oexle added, “Five Star Bank is committed to investing in and supporting the communities we serve. We are very pleased to support BFNC’s Hope Center and its important mission in Buffalo.” 

The goal of the new Institute for Sustainable Economic Impact & Financial Well-Being is to empower program participants to achieve economic stability and financial success.  Participants will have the opportunity to attend a 6-week program that includes a series of financial education workshops and direct opportunities for participants to enhance budgeting skills, develop a savings plan, learn investing, debt reduction, and financial goal setting.

A Focus on Active Team Work 

After the 6-week financial education program, the participants are connected to a Hope Center financial coach that will assist each participant with implementing what they have learned. 

Encouragement and Celebrating Success

Participants who successfully complete the financial education program will receive certificates of accomplishment and gift cards.  
 

ABOUT BUFFALO FEDERATION OF COMMUNITY CENTERS (BFNC)

The Buffalo Federation of Neighborhood Centers (BFNC), a 501c3 organization established in 1981 by the merger of the Westminster Community House and the Neighborhood House Association has served Buffalo and Erie County since 1893. BFNC’s strength in serving the community is based on integrating care coordination, housing, social rehabilitation or activities, financial management, wrap-around, and other services through our core programs and services to meet an individual’s unique needs. www.bfnc.org

ABOUT THE BFNC HOPE CENTER

The BFNC Hope Center, is a neighborhood center for individuals and families focusing on economic advancement, financial empowerment and education.  Modeled after the successful “Pathway to Prosperity” developed by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Center has been successful establishing a network of financial resources with a common goal of helping individuals improve their financial status.  Major support and funding are received from the United Way of Buffalo and Erie County and Five Star Bank. The BFNC Hope Center is also a member of the United Way CASH Coalition, an agency collaboration with a focus on improving the financial health of hard-working families in Western New York.

ABOUT FIVE STAR BANK

Five Star Bank provides a wide range of consumer and commercial banking and lending services to individuals, municipalities, and businesses through a network of more than 50 offices throughout Western and Central New York State. Additional Five Star Bank information is available at www.five-starbank.com, on Twitter, and on Facebook. 


Discovering An Eastside Historic Asset

Buffalo Federation of Neighborhood Centers: In the Community and Serving the Community

12/15/17

Have you seen a large yellow building on the corner of Orange and Virginia Streets? That building is affectionately known by longtime Fruit Belt residents as the Neighborhood House, operated by the Buffalo Federation of Neighborhood Centers (BFNC). BFNC prepares and empowers its neighbors, and is connected to an over 100-year history of community service that began in 1893. The organization is now transitioning to fill additional needs through
the Westminster Commons—a proposed senior housing development that will become an addition to the historic Westminster Community House on Monroe Street. 

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HNFMMC hosts Community Health Conference

Representatives from more than 60 area service providers discuss ways to improve patient care.

June 15, 2017​
courtesy of The Niagara Gazette 

Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center has, in recent years, undertaken an effort to consolidate, streamline and better connect the numerous treatments and services it offers in an effort to stem social and economic factors that damage community health. 

On Wednesday, the hospital took part in a conference involving more than 60 local service organizations in an attempt to establish a similar network with shared goals among the providers. It's something the medical center's COO Sheila Kee called a "coalition of the willing," or more formally, "the Niagara Community Partnership Project."

About 140 attendees were present at the conference, held at the Four Points by Sheridan on Buffalo Avenue, to discuss the initiative. The broad goal is to improve the level of care coordination between health care providers and community agencies.

The keynote speaker was Paul Hogan, executive vice president of the John R. Oishei Foundation. The Buffalo-based foundation enhances the economic vitality and quality of life for the Buffalo Niagara region through grant-making, leadership and network building.

Kee said that means devising "ways we can work more effectively for vulnerable people in our community." At the medical center, the philosophy is called a "full circle of care."

"That circle of care has to expand greatly now to make sure that these community groups join us along the perimeter of the circle," Kee said.

Tammy Fox, a director of project management with Millennium Collaborative Care, said getting people to the right organizations for social or economic support will drive down unnecessary hospital visits by keeping a closer eye on, and coordinating, a larger scope of care.

PHOTO ABOVE: ​Michael Williams with the Buffalo Federation Neighborhood Center says a few words to his conference colleagues.